Courses

The Wind Energy Master courses are structured into weekly modules with a variety of learning activities such as viewing short video lectures, readings, quizzes, calculation exercises, compilation of reports, and virtual poster presentations. There will be weekly deadlines, which you must fulfill in order to pass the courses.

Within each course week, you can plan your working effort as you wish and study anywhere you want. This gives you a high degree of flexibility. We will organize a number of live online sessions as part of each course. Some sessions are optional and others are mandatory but we highly recommend that you participate since it will add greatly to the community and to your connection with both fellow participants and the teachers. 

Read more about the nine courses below and watch the introduction videos to get a glimpse of the teachers on the programme and the subjects they will cover. 

 

 

Wind Turbine Technology

Course description
This course gives the participant a general introduction to wind turbine technology, covering the wind turbine as well as aerodynamics, loads, composite structure, structural dynamics, electrical systems, and control. The participant learns to describe a wind turbine system as well as its components and how it works. 

Learning objectives

After completing this course, the participant is able to:

  • Describe the basic components of a wind turbine.
  • Describe a steady Blade Element Momentum (BEM) method to model the aerodynamic forces on a rotor.
  • Apply a steady BEM.
  • Describe a typical blade structure.
  • Explain main load cases and criteria for the structural design of blades.
  • Distinguish between various types of turbines.
  • Explain the electrical design and control of the basic wind turbine types.
  • Design a maximum power point tracking controller for a wind turbine.

Duration and exam
The course runs over 13 weeks and finishes with a written exam.

ECTS points
The course gives 5 ECTS points, equivalent to 9-10 hours per week.

Course responsible
Researcher Philipp Ulrich Hasselbach, DTU Wind Energy

 

Wind Resources

Course description

The course will provide the participant with the necessary tools and understanding to perform energy resource assessment at various scales. The course covers topics like, large-scale atmospheric and mesoscale motion and force balances; relevant thermodynamic effects; basic atmospheric boundary layer structure and flow phenomena; micro- and mesoscale modeling and practices, including basic parameterizations and numerical aspects, turbine representation and wakes; and analysis and use of wind statistics (incl. e.g. wind atlas data). 

Learning objectives
After completing this course, the participant is able to:

  • List the mechanisms that affect the Annual Energy Production (AEP) of a wind farm.
  • Explain the basic driving mechanisms for wind, from global processes down to those linked to the local topography.
  • Explain the differences between micro- and mesoscale modelling, and how they can be used together.
  • Identify potential errors in the setup of mesoscale and microscale models, through inspection of both inputs/setup and model results.
  • Explain the principles, assumptions, and limitations behind a wind atlas (e.g. Global Wind Atlas or regional wind atlases), and use a wind atlas for simple resource estimation.
  • Calculate the AEP for simple sites and wind farms, as driven by observations or potentially mesoscale model output.
  • Analyze meteorological time series of mean wind and direction with statistical methods.
  • Select optimal wind farm layouts based on local conditions.
  • Design numerical setup (type[s] of models, parameters, inputs needed) for wind resource assessment campaigns, including observations.

Duration and exam
The course runs over 13 weeks and finishes with an oral exam.

ECTS points
The course gives 5 ECTS points, equivalent to 9-10 hours per week.

Course responsible
Associate Professor Jacob Berg, DTU Wind Energy

 

Materials for Wind Energy

Course description
This course will give the participant thorough knowledge of materials, structures and properties with special emphasis on the requirements in a wind turbine. The participant receives an introduction to the materials used in wind turbines and the loads they are subjected to. The focus in the course is on composites and metals. Issues with manufacturing, predictions and measurements are addressed. For the composites, the ability of tailoring, predicting and measuring the mechanical properties of non-crimp fabric composites are addressed. For the metals, the properties of the most common steel types and the most common failure modes are addressed. 

Learning objectives
After completing this course, the participant is able to:

  • List, classify and explain the main requirements of the structural materials used in a wind turbine.
  • Calculate simple load cases for selected sub-components.
  • Describe the configuration of typical composite materials for wind turbines and their manufacturing process.
  • Predict stiffness and strength of unidirectional composites.
  • Describe a testing strategy for measurements of the governing mechanical properties of composites.
  • Classify the different types of failure modes in metals, and describe ways to prevent them.
  • Classify different forms of corrosion in metals, and describe ways to prevent them.
  • Relate heat treatment and microstructure of steel.
  • Describe the concept behind damage-tolerant materials.
  • Predict the materials lifetime for dynamically loaded structures.
  • Dimension the sub-components in a wind turbine based on materials properties.

Duration and exam
The course runs over 13 weeks and finishes with an oral exam.

ECTS points
The course gives 5 ECTS points, equivalent to 9-10 hours per week.

Course responsible
Associate Professor, Lars Pilgaard Mikkelsen, DTU Wind Energy

 

Wind Energy in Society

Course description
This course provides an overview of the elements of the planning for the development of a wind farm. The siting of a wind farm is explained within the context of society, the environment and fundamental economic principles.

Learning objectives
After completing this course, the participant is able to:

  • Describe the major steps in the planning process to obtain the planning permit a) onshore, and b) offshore.
  • Explain the main steps in the process when carrying out an environmental impact study (EIA).
  • Identify the main environmental impacts of wind power and suggest mitigation measures.
  • Describe possible ways in which a local community can benefit from a wind farm.
  • Give major common concerns of people living close to wind farms and how these could be addressed.
  • List principle stakeholders in a typical project and outline their possible interests.
  • List common developer types and the main characteristics of their approaches to stakeholder engagement.
  • Calculate three key financial parameters for a wind farm project and explain their relevance.
  • List commonly used policy support mechanisms for wind energy and discuss their advantages and disadvantages.
  • Explain the fundamental characteristics of a) private economics and b) socio-economics.

Duration and exam
The course runs over 13 weeks and finishes with an oral exam.

ECTS points
The course gives 5 ECTS points, equivalent to 9-10 hours per week.

Course responsible
Special Advisor Tom Cronin, DTU Wind Energy

 

Aerodynamics and Aeroelasticity

Course description
The general course objective is to learn and implement the basic models used inside a full commercial aeroelastic code for load estimations on a wind turbine. This includes a coupling between unsteady rotor aerodynamics and a dynamic structural model of the wind turbine. The participant will implement a simple aeroelastic model of a wind turbine in a numerical framework (e.g. Matlab or Python) that couples a simple structural model with an unsteady aerodynamic rotor model. The participant will also implement a basic controller and simulate the response of a wind turbine during normal operation.

Learning objectives
After completing this course, the participant is able to:

  • Implement an unsteady Blade Element Momentum method to model the aerodynamic forces on a rotor.
  • Describe and implement a dynamic wake/inflow model in the unsteady aerodynamic model.
  • Describe and implement unsteady 2-D aerodynamics in the unsteady aerodynamic model.
  • Describe and derive how the atmospheric turbulent inflow excites the rotor structure and leads to the turbine load.
  • Describe alternative aerodynamic models for rotors.
  • Couple the unsteady aerodynamic model with a simple structural model.
  • Implement a basic wind turbine controller.
  • Simulate and describe the static and dynamic response and loads on a turbine.

Duration and exam
The course runs over 13 weeks and finishes with a written exam.

ECTS points
The course gives 5 ECTS points, equivalent to 9-10 hours per week.

Course responsible
Associate Professor Martin O. L. Hansen, DTU Wind Energy

 

Grid Connection and Integration of Wind Power

Course description
The focus of the course is on grid connection of wind power plants as well as challenges and solutions to grid integration. The participant is introduced to the electrical system connecting the wind turbine generators in a wind farm. Then the power system characteristics are explained in order to understand power system requirements to grid connection of wind farms transforming them into wind power plants. Finally, the wind power plant is introduced as a wind farm, which meets those power system requirements.

Learning objectives
After completing this course, the participant is able to:

  • List basic electrical components in a wind farm.
  • Design the electrical power collection system in a wind farm.
  • Calculate electrical losses in a wind farm under different wind conditions.
  • Analyze voltage profiles in a wind farm under different wind conditions.
  • Describe the basic principles for frequency, voltage and power quality characteristics in a power system.
  • Identify the challenges of integrating wind power.
  • Describe requirements (grid codes) for grid connection of wind power plants.
  • Explain the structure of wind power plant control.
  • Analyze the impact of large-scale wind power on frequency control.
  • Assess the compliance of a wind power plant with requirements to reactive power capability.
  • Evaluate the impact of a wind power plant on power quality.

Duration and exam
The course runs over 13 weeks and finishes with a written exam.

ECTS points
The course gives 5 ECTS points, equivalent to 9-10 hours per week.

Course responsible
Senior Researcher Anca Daniela Hansen, DTU Wind Energy

 

Numerical Tools in Wind Energy

Course description
In this course, the participant is given an overview of numerical tools and the concepts of physical vs. model world, measurement vs. modelling, resolution and scale in modelling, verification and validation of models, as well as sensitivity analysis and best engineering practice is covered. The participant will then choose one specific tool to work with for the rest of the course.

Learning objectives
After completing this course, the participant is able to:

  • List the different numerical tools used at DTU Wind Energy and their typical applications.
  • Explain the basics of selected tools and their operational envelopes.
  • Illustrate the concept of model verification and validation.
  • Choose a numerical tool for a given application.
  • Apply a selected tool on a predefined setup.
  • Set up a selected tool for solving a given problem.
  • Analyse the sensitivity of different setups for a given case.
  • Select the optimal setup for a given problem.
  • Evaluate the uncertainties of the results predicted by a selected tool.

Duration and exam
The course runs over 13 weeks and finishes with a written exam.

ECTS points
The course gives 5 ECTS points, equivalent to 9-10 hours per week.

Course responsible
Senior Researcher Niels Troldborg, DTU Wind Energy

 

Offshore Wind Energy

Course description
This course will introduce the participant to offshore wind energy and the engineering methods specific to this field of wind energy. The participant will go through subjects such as offshore design codes, calculation of wake loads in linear regular and irregular waves, engineering methods for rotor loads as well as substructure types and their relative strength and floating wind turbines.

Learning objectives
After completing this course, the participant is able to:

  • Describe the main elements of offshore wind turbine systems and the differences to land-based turbines.
  • Summarize the content of the offshore turbine design standard IEC 61400-3.
  • Calculate a force time series from linear irregular waves.
  • Derive simplistic rotor load time series from wind turbine parameters and understand the concept of aerodynamic damping.
  • Explain the basics of wake effects inside offshore wind farms.
  • Describe the typical foundation types for bottom-fixed offshore wind turbines and decide on foundation types (floating, jacket, monopile).
  • Explain the basic dynamics of bottom fixed offshore wind turbines and the method for fatigue calculations.
  • Apply the elements of a design basis together with simplified models for the conceptual design of a substructure. Write up simplified equations of motion for a floating wind turbine configuration and determine the natural frequencies.
  • Comprehend the economics of levelized cost of energy.

Duration and exam
The course runs over 13 weeks and finishes with an oral exam.

ECTS points
The course gives 5 ECTS points, equivalent to 9-10 hours per week.

Course responsible
Professor Henrik Bredmose, DTU Wind Energy

 

Measurement Techniques in Wind Energy

Course description
The focus of the course is measurement techniques used in and around wind turbines, including use of the relevant international standards and evaluation of uncertainty. The course covers subjects such as data acquisition and management, measurement uncertainty and wind measurements as well as measurements of; wind turbine power performance, wind turbine loads and structural response and wind turbine noise.

Learning objectives
After completing this course, the participant is able to:

  • Design outlines of data acquisition systems considering the requirements and the local conditions.
  • Organize wind measurements in a database.
  • Perform quality control on wind measurements.
  • Define the concept of uncertainty for a measured quantity.
  • Identify relevant measurement standards in wind energy.
  • Produce a cup calibration report from wind tunnel measurements including assessment of uncertainty.
  • Analyze wind speed measurements for a wind resource assessment. Determine wind turbine power performance from measurements.
  • Determine structural properties for a wind turbine from measurements.
  • Select the most suitable wind measurement technology.
  • Explain different methods for structural loads measurements on wind turbines.
  • Explain wind turbine noise measurements.

Duration and exam
The course runs over 13 weeks and finishes with a written exam.

ECTS points
The course gives 5 ECTS points, equivalent to 9-10 hours per week.

Course responsible
Senior Researcher Michael Courtney, DTU Wind Energy

Wind Turbine Technology

Wind Resources

Materials for Wind Energy

Wind Energy in Society

Aerodynamics and aeroelasticity

Grid Connection and Integration

Numerical Tools in Wind Energy

Offshore Wind Energy

Measurement Techniques